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  • In order to properly treat inflammatory ear conditions or ear infections, topical ear medications are often necessary. Some cats will tolerate the administration of liquids or ointments in their ears while others may become irritable or upset. Make sure you have carefully read the medication’s label and understand the instructions, including the amount of medication you should apply and how often, and then follow the step-by-step procedure below.

  • The proper administration of eye medication is critical in helping your cat quickly recover from an eye injury or infection. Make sure you have carefully read the drug label and understand the prescription instructions.

  • The proper administration of eye medications is essential for your cat's prompt recovery. Make sure that you wash your hands both before and after administering the medication to avoid contamination and prevent the spread of infection. Before you begin, read the ointment label so you understand the instructions.

  • Applying topical medications to your pet can sometimes be a challenge. This information may help make treating your pet easier - for both of you.

  • Primary vaccination is essential in order to prevent the return of the once common deadly infectious diseases in kittens and cats. Recent research indicates that not all vaccines require yearly boosters. However, there is no evidence that annual booster vaccination is anything but beneficial to the majority of cats. Ultimately, how frequently your cat should be vaccinated is determined by your cat’s lifestyle and relative risk. Ask your veterinarian about the type and schedule of vaccines that is appropriate for your cat.

  • Approximately 20% of cats across all ages suffer from painful osteoarthritis in one or more joints. The incidence of osteoarthritis increases with age. Because cats are living longer, it is more likely than ever that every cat owner will face the issue of osteoarthritis at some point.

  • Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex condition involving inflammation and degeneration of one or more joints. Cats with OA experience pain and inflammation in various joints that interfere with the activities of daily living.

  • Aspergillosis is an infection, growth, or allergic response caused by the Aspergillus fungus. This fungus grows on dead leaves, stored grain, compost piles, or other decaying vegetation. The Aspergillus species includes more than 150 types of mold that occur widely in the indoor and outdoor environment.

  • Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent used to treat mild to moderate pain, to reduce inflammation and to reduce fever. In veterinary medicine, it is prescribed most commonly to treat blood clots in cats.

  • Aspirin is a commonly used over the counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and is used to treat fever, pain, inflammation (swelling), and clotting disorders in humans. Aspirin poisoning occurs when a cat ingests a toxic dose of aspirin, either through misuse or accidentally. Clinical signs depend on how much aspirin was eaten. Treatment for aspirin poisoning depends on how quickly the cat is seen by the veterinarian.

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Location Hours
Monday8:30am – 5:30pm
Tuesday8:30am – 5:30pm
Wednesday8:30am – 5:30pm
Thursday8:30am – 5:30pm
Friday8:30am – 5:30pm
SaturdayClosed
SundayClosed

House Call Services: By Appointment Only (usually beginning or end of business day)

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